Aiweiwei

Weekend reading list – week of January 12

January 16, 2015

Every week, TP1 shares our top 5 reads pulled from local and international sources. Here’s your can’t-miss content for the week of January 12.

“Where are you, Papa?”
Following the tragic events at Charlie Hebdo, countless and increasingly touching tributes have been sketched and written. Here is one by Elsa Wolinski, the daughter of Georges Wolinski, one of the best known cartoonists at Charlie Hebdo who was killed during the attack.
Read it on the Elle France website (French only)

Extra! Extra! Read all about it!
The media has always been at war for our attention, relying on sensational headlines in progressively larger point types. The milieu, however, is evolving and transforming right before our eyes. This in-depth article looks at how media start-ups like BuzzFeed and Circa are better suited to the new media model.
Read it on Wired

Content is king!
What’s in store for 2015? This excellent report issued by the Canada Media Fund identifies the major media trends for the coming year, including, of course, content.
Read it on the CMF website

Freedom
Chinese artist Ai Weiwei has been living under permanent surveillance since 2011. What does this mean for our future, if we continue to expose ourselves so openly to technology?
Read it on Medium

Facebook at Work
Having your Facebook profile open while at work will no longer be such a big deal with “Facebook at Work”, a new professional work tool that will help you connect with colleagues who might not be your Facebook friends.
Read it on Wired

Book recommendation for the week:
Stiffed: The Betrayal of the American Man by Susan Faludi, American humanist, journalist and author, who has won numerous prizes, including the prestigious Pulitzer. The book, published in 1999, looks at the declining state of masculinity in late 20th-century America.

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Read and recommended by @John_Pankert, strategist at TP1

Happy reading!
– The TP1 team

Image : The installation «Sunflower seeds» of the artist Ai Weiwei